5 BEST BEER FESTIVALS IN NEW ZEALAND

We round up 5 of the best beer festivals taking place across New Zealand this summer.

All of them are reusable and are the most sustainable festivals out there. 

From Queenstown to little old Cambridge.

We put the spotlight on 5 beer festivals worth adding to your summer calendar.

Without further ado…

The Great kiwi Beer Festival Globelets

The Great kiwi Beer Festival Globelets

1. The Great Kiwi Beer Festival

Join the beer festival that has to sample 300+ craft beers and ciders from a selection of NZ's best craft breweries! Plus taste your way around the wares of the best food trucks in town and get down to the sounds of some great live entertainment.

The Great Kiwi Beer Festival is a celebration of the brewing industry in New Zealand, hosted by industry experts.

Attendees will be able to sample brews from diverse locales spanning from Europe to Asia, and the presence of many brewmasters onsite will give patrons the opportunity to interact with the people behind their favourite brands.

With live performance, cooking demonstrations, seminars, brand experience areas, beer and food matching and much more, The Great Kiwi Beer Festival is the ultimate "cheers" to New Zealand's affinity with the great amber nectar.

Where: Christchurch, New Zealand

When: January

Dunedin Beer Festival

2. Dunedin Craft Beer Festival

Lock it in friends: the November with see the Fifth instalment of the Dunedin Craft Beer & Food Festival take over the entire pitch of the Forsyth Barr Stadium.

With tantalising treats that'll appeal to every kind of palate, and entertainment for the young and old - from seminars to bouncy castles to high-quality kiwi music - we reckon it's the highlight of the calendar year!

They are also offering a homebrew competition this year, where you could be the 2017 Dunedin Craft Beer festivals beer of the year :) 

Where: Dunedin, New Zealand

When: November

Summer Beer Festival Globelet

Summer Beer Festival Globelet

3. Summer Beer Festival Queenstown

Come check out some of New Zealand's best craft breweries in the heart of Queenstown: Garage Project, Tuatara, 8Wired, Panhead, Cargo and many more.

Set in the mighty Queenstown. Who could ask for a better place to have a beer? 

Where: Queenstown, New Zealand

When: January 

Chow and Tipple

Chow and Tipple

4. Chow and Tipple

The Chow & Tipple is a boutique Food, Beer & Wine Festival based in Cambridge, New Zealand. The inaugural event is set to take place March. 

It is one of the latest editions to our Beer Festivals in New Zealand

Where: Cambridge, New Zealand

When: March 

Beast of a Feast

Beast of a Feast

5. Beast of a Feast

Beast of a Feast returns in 2018 and this summer's hottest craft beer and food festival in Mount Maunganui! A rockstar lineup of some of New Zealand's best breweries and street food vendors provides the perfect setting for you to acclimatise to a new year! Challenge your mates to a match of table tennis or perhaps meet the brewers behind the beers at ‘The Beer Affair’ tent. Compete for spending credit with competitions throughout the day! Or just sit back and enjoy the entertainment on the big stage!

Beast of a Feast will be held on the 3rd of January at Soper Reserve, Mount Maunganui.

Where: Mt Manganui, New Zealand

When: January


Do you know of any other great Beer Festivals that should be reusable and sustainable with Globelet?

Beer Festival Globelet

Beer Festival Globelet

10 Best Music Festivals in Australia and New Zealand 2017

10 Best Music Festivals in Australia and New Zealand

We round up 10 of the best music festivals taking place across Australisa this summer.

They are also the 10 greenest festivals on this side of the ditch.

All of them are reusable and are the most sustainable festivals out there. 

From Beer Gardens, Surf Beaches, to watching the action from your very own yacht, or just surfing someone New Zealand coastline – there’s something for everyone when it comes to summer music festivals here in New Zealand.

We put the spotlight on 10 festivals worth adding to your summer calendar Without further ado…

Rhythm and Vines Reusable Cups -2017

Rhythm and Vines Reusable Cups -2017

1. RHYTHM AND VINES

The first festival to see the sun. This year the organiser’s have gone all out to produce an unforgettable experience with a consistent line-up of hard hitting party starters. The festival sold out last year and we almost sold out of reusable cups.

If there is one festival to go to down under it is this. 

Where: Waiohika Estate, Gisborne, New Zealand 

When: December 29 – 31, 2017

Splore Festival - 2017

Splore Festival - 2017

2. SPLORE FESTIVAL

New Zealands best kept secret. Splore is likely to be one of the best music festivals in the world. Set in a spectacular location – you can watch acts on the main stage as you soak up the sun on the beach, or even from the yacht. Yes, you can bring your own boat. Splore also focused on becoming a Zero Waste festival and have their own wedding chapel.

Where: Tapapakanga Regional Park, 70km out of Auckland, New Zealand 

When: February 19 – 21, 2018

Northern Bass Festival Cup 2017

Northern Bass Festival Cup 2017

3. NORTHERN BASS

Northern Bass brings together all elements of local and international bass culture even the most clued-up enthusiasts didn’t even know about – grime, drum n bass, boom bap, neurocrunk, glitch-hop, ghetto funk, hip-hop, funk, dubstep and more.

Where: Worsfold Farm, Mangawhai, New Zealand

When: December 30 – 31, 2017

Reusable Cups at Womad Festival 

Reusable Cups at Womad Festival 

4. WOMAD 

The World of Music, Arts and Dance (WOMAD) brings together a melting pot of styles and artists from across the globe and throws them right into the heart of the mighty Taranaki. The festival has a central aim of celebrating the world’s many forms of music, arts and dance and is known for its breathtaking performances and family friendly atmosphere. They celebrate ten years on the block this March.

Where: TSB Arena and Brooklands Bowl, New Plymouth, New Zealand

When: March 18 – 20, 2018

Woodford Folk Festival Cup 2017

Woodford Folk Festival Cup 2017

5. WOODFORD FOLK FESTIVAL

Woodford is the 6-day summer festival of freedom, music and expression. Set in the deep forest inland from the Sunshine Coast. You will be blown away by one of Australia's oldest and best festivals. The festival is a multi-genre event with an array of different styles of music.

Where:Woodford, QLD, Australia 

When: December 27-2nd, 2017

Coastella Music Festival

Coastella Music Festival

6. COASTELLA

Set in the beautiful Kapiti Coast. Coastella you could say is New Zealand's play on the famous, Coachella :) But on the coast. Only 30 minutes out of Wellington it is one of the newest music festivals to open up in New Zealand! The one-day Festival showcases established and emerging local and international artists with an eclectic range of music covering indie rock, Americana, folk, Irish, pop, New Orleans swing, hip hop, singer songwriters, dreamy pop and electro.

Where: Kapiti Coast, Wellington, New Zealand 

When: February, 2018

Caloundra Music Festival Reusable Cups 

Caloundra Music Festival Reusable Cups 

7. Caloundra Music Festival

Enjoy four days of Sun, Surf and Soul at the beautiful Kings Beach on the Sunshine Coast!
The eleventh annual Caloundra Music Festival will be held over the September/October long weekend. 
The beautiful Kings Beach and surrounds will come alive to the sounds of a diverse line-up of entertainment featuring the best of the Australian music industry as well as incredible international artists. 

This not for profit family-friendly community event celebrates the environment, cultural achievements and community pride of the Caloundra area.

Where: Caloundra, QLD, Australia

When: September 2017

Hokitika Wild Foods Festival Cups

Hokitika Wild Foods Festival Cups

8. Hokitika WildFoods Festival

One of the most iconic events in New Zealand. Hokitika Wild Foods is a festival not to be missed. Over 6000 people head to the one prettiest parts of New Zealand to experience a food and Music Festival like no other. Prepare to eat testicals and Sperm while you kick back and listen to good music at night, while sipping one of New Zealands most famous craft beers out of a Globelet.

Where: Hokitika, New Zealand

When: March, 2018

Nostalgia Music Festival Reusable Cups 

Nostalgia Music Festival Reusable Cups 

9. Nostalgia Music Festival

Ranked one of the most popular music festivals in New Zealand. Nostalgia started as a boutique music festival on the side, to become one of the most successful up and coming festivals in New Zealand. An exclusive showcase of local food, drink, and entertainment - where top quality produce, products, and people come together with live performances from a select line-up of New Zealand’s finest musicians. 
 

Where: Christchurch, New Zealand

When: April 2018

Oro Music Festival Reusable Cups

Oro Music Festival Reusable Cups

10. Oro Music Festival

The youngest of all our festivals who decided to be green from day one. Oro Festival is the latest addition to New Zealand's Music Festival scene. Oro is part owned by one of New Zealands Maori tribes and is set out amongst their forest one hour out of Auckland.  

Where: Auckland, New Zealand

When: April 2018

GLOBELET TSHIRT

SUPPORT REUSABLE AND GREEN FESTIVALS

90% OF FESTIVALS IN NEW ZEALAND HAVE DECIDED TO BE GREEN. THEY HAVE STOPPED USING SINGLE USE COMPOSTABLE AND PLASTIC CUPS AND DECIDED TO SUPPORT NEW ZEALAND MADE AND STOP WASTE. HELP US CREATE A REUSABLE SOCIETY THAT MAKES OUR FESTIVALS GREENER. 

DO YOU KNOW OF A FESTIVAL THAT SHOULD BE ON THE LIST?
COMMENT BELOW

Reusable Beer cups were hottest souvenir of Rio Olympics

gymnastics-souvenir-cups_rio_ap_slashtemplate.jpg

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Will Rodriguez put his collectible cup down just for a second, then — swoosh! — it was swiped.

He owned one of the hottest souvenirs of the Rio de Janeiro Games: A plastic Olympic gymnastics beer cup.

“That was a good one,” Rodriguez, of Dallas, lamented.

Yes, the Olympics has yet another cupping craze, though this one involves the swirling orange, blue and green color patterns on a yellow cup that include the name and silhouette for more than two dozen sports.

The most common sight at Olympic venues aren’t medals draped around necks, but fans walking around with arms full, fixated on finding the next beer stand and hoarding empty cups.

Beer here!

Sure, but fans are chugging — and sometimes just dumping — their half liters (about 17 ounces) of Skol lager simply for the empty cups. Then it’s back in line to put another 13 Brazilian reals (about $4) on the growing beer tab. That totals at least 300 reals for the set.

The cups are suddenly fueling the merchandise machine and have been traded, sold, and yes, even stolen, as fans clamor for hard-to-find sports such as gymnastics and soccer this deep into the Olympics.

About an hour before boxing’s Sunday evening session started, fans lined up 25 deep at some “cerveja” stands ready to go another round.

The long lines weren’t necessarily because of slow pours from the can into the cup. Once at the front of the line, fans would shake through stacks of cups until they found the one sport they wanted.

“Boxe! Boxe! Boxe!” one fan shouted in Portuguese in his search for boxing.

“No! No!” the server shouted, as he pointed to one of the other stands at Rio Centro.

So off the man went, without a beer, with a more pressing mission on tap for the night.

Trampoline, tennis, equestrian, taekwondo and water polo were the most common cups found Sunday at the complex that’s home to boxing, table tennis, badminton and weightlifting.

Brazilian native Sergio De Oliveira, now of Hoboken, New Jersey, wore his Team USA hat and shirt and gripped his equestrian (“hipismo”) cup.

De Oliveira and husband Terry Miles are trying to collect the cups of all 14 events they’ve seen at the Olympics.

De Oliveira had no idea that when he bought a gymnastics cup at the opening ceremony, the hunk of plastic would soon spark a memorabilia frenzy.

“It was huge we got it all,” Miles said.

Miles doesn’t drink, leaving all the beer guzzling to De Oliveira.

They have about 10 cups so far, but had yet to find their No. 1 target — archery. They also wanted synchronized diving.

But don’t expect the couple to auction the cups on eBay to recoup the 130 reals and counting they’ve spent on their collectibles. They are keeping most of them and will share a few with friends back in the United States.

Carmen Pruneda, of San Antonio, Texas, had no interest in sipping any light blonde lager.

“I’m looking for cups, but I don’t drink beer,” she said.

Pruneda has traded pins for cups, and cups for pins. She hit a bit of good luck when a woman dropped a cup on an escalator. The woman asked Pruneda if she was a collector. When she said yes, the stranger gave her both of her cups, boosting Pruneda’s total to six.

One beer server said it was forbidden to just buy a cup.

The trinkets are a steal compared to other Olympic merchandise. Olympic hats are going for about 60 reals, T-shirts for 80 to 100 and keychains are 35. One man bought a beach towel at the souvenir stand — a soft landing spot for the three cups he then stuffed inside his shopping bag.

Come to think of it, those purple circles dotting Michael Phelps’ shoulder and back from his cupping therapy do look like coasters.

Maybe he wouldn’t mind serving as a true arm rest for the cups at the next Olympic bash.

While stuffed trash bags and overflowing bins of Skol aluminum beer cans are a sore sight at the games, there’s not a plastic cup around to recycle.

“It has been a good way to keep litter down,” Rodriguez said.

Republished from - http://nbc4i.com/2016/08/15/gymnastics-beer-cups-are-hottest-souvenir-of-rio-olympics/

THE 10 MOST SUSTAINABLE STADIUMS IN THE WORLD

Every year stadiums and major events across the world are going reusable. From the Rio Olympics, Rugby World Cup, Fifa World Cup and more. They all decided to stop using single use plastic cups. 

WHY?

Reusables increase revenue.
Reusables are great for the environment. 

Reusable Cup Stade de France

Reusable Cup Stade de France

1. Stad de France

Stade de France is the flagship stadium of France. As France is the first country in the world to ban disposable plastic, it seems fitting that Stade de France is the first on our list.

Facts:

Where: Paris, France

Date it went reusable: 2010 first stadium in the world to go reusable

2. Rio Olympics

The Olympics went reusable. It transformed their beer sales, created a scarce momento and eliminated all their single use waste. Reportedly fans lined up not for the beer but for the cups. 

Where: Rio, Brazil

3. 2015 Rugby World Cup

Reusable ecocups from Rugby at Twickenham Stadium

Reusable ecocups from Rugby at Twickenham Stadium

England decided to set the standard and in 2015 Twickenham Stadium went fully reusable with the Rugby World Cup reusable "Fan Cup". Over 140,000 single use cups were being thrown away every event, so with reusable Globelet like cups this has now been reduced to zero. 

Estimated Increase in Revenue:  $1-300,000 AUD per event
Estimated Waste Savings: 140,000 single use cups
Facts

The Twickenham Fan Cup has provided:

  • A cleaner stadium and significantly reduced the waste leaving the stadium.
  • A quality cup to enjoy a drink at no extra cost.
  • A value souvenir to remember your experience at Twickenham Stadium.

Where: Twickenham, England

4. Soccer World Cup

Soccer World Cup Reusable Cups

Soccer World Cup Reusable Cups

Yes Brazil went reusable for the Rio Olympics, but it also did it for the Soccer World Cup. It increased beer sales, and was a bright cup which meant that people enjoyed getting photos taken.  

Where: Rio, Brazil

5. Euro 2016

Euro 2016 Cups France

Euro 2016 Cups France

These are probably some of the best looking reusable cups we have ever seen.  Made for the Euro 2016 soccer world cup. This event was impressive with their WASTE MANAGEMENT actions, with a complete report on why they want to stop single use waste. They went on to achieve a 50% recycling rate, zero waste to landfill and greater public awareness by following the 3R Strategy (Reduction, Reuse, Recycle). 

Where: France

6. Stade de la Beaujoire

Stade de la Beaujoire Cups

Stade de la Beaujoire Cups

Stade de la Beaujoire is leading the way with its partnering stadium Stade de France. Every Rugby Club in France has it's own collection of reusable cups where the rugby clubs have committed to eliminate single use waste. 

Where: Beaujoire, France

Run or manage a major venue or event? 

We partner and supply over 3000 events. Email us and find out how we can transform your event. 

Name *
Name

 

 

MAKE MORE MONEY AND GO DISPOSABLE PLASTIC FREE

MAKE MORE MONEY AND GO DISPOSABLE PLASTIC FREE

Many said you could never hold a large, multi-day music festival without using disposable water bottles. The festival would lose to much money. Womad Festival and Globelet proved the naysayers wrong. The decision to go disposable cup free was a major success. Over 3000 bottles stopped a normal 15,000 single use bottles from going to landfill Communication was necessary to ensure that festival goers, musicians and staff still had easy access to water and drinking containers. Womad, with the help of Globelet, continues to create the model of a truly sustainable, disposable-free festival. We are proud to work alongside them, now in our 3rd year as a partner

Woodford Folk Festival - Case Study

Woodford Folk Festival - Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 1987
  • Globelet: 1 years

  • Location: Woodford, QLD

  • Attendees: 35,000

  • Globelet's used: 100, 000

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 270,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold.

FIVE greenest festivals in New Zealand

Check out our list of the greenist events where you can party sustainably.

Splore 2016 - Pink 

Splore 2016 - Pink 

Music festivals around the world are involved in a race to make themselves more sustainable than their rivals. As well as doing the world a solid, a cabinet full of green awards means good press and, hopefully, even better ticket sales. In the world of music festivals, the green initiatives in place are mind-boggling. Splore (pictured above) is the only festival with 'A Greener festival Award' and was the first three day festival to go disposable water bottle free; Womad is arguable the biggest green festival in New Zealand; and the our biggest and most renowned festival - Northern Bass is probably the only Bass Festival that has decided to go single use cup free in the world.

Here are five more sustainable music events in New Zealand. 

SPLORE

This Auckland festival is a giant among men when it comes to sustainability. And it's all because of Splore's founders care so much about doing the right thing. It is the leader in New Zealand for sustainable events. It was the first multi day festival to go single use disposable cups free. It was the first festival to go single use water bottle free. 

Splore Music Festival, 2010 Kawakawa Bay, NZ. photo by Peter Caughey

Splore Music Festival, 2010 Kawakawa Bay, NZ. photo by Peter Caughey

WOMAD

WOMAD is always striving to be the best it can be. It is the pioneering spirit of sustainability for festivals and events in New Zealand. If people think sustainable festival, they think Womad. Just count the reasons how: The festival recycles 70 percent of its waste thanks to Beyond The Bin

Womad Music Festival, photo by Jessica Leong

Womad Music Festival, photo by Jessica Leong

NORTHERN BASS 

NORTHERN BASS is one of the worlds biggest and best Bass Festivals. It is also probably the greenist bass festival in the world. Drink demand is high and sustainability demand is low. However, the owners are pioneers and driving to make the festival as incredible as they can. Its mother company Fuzen Entertainment is owned by some of the most successful event managers in New Zealand. They have seen what waste can do, and went out to make Northern Bass different. 

Northern Bass

SILO PARK  

SIlo Park has transformed the Auckland Food scene. In 2016/2017 they decided to go disposable cup free with huge success. With an event on every week, they were the first successful food market, that consistently eliminated single use disposable cups. 

Silo Park - 2017 

Silo Park - 2017 

ORO FESTIVAL 

ORO FESTIVAL is the newest festival on the New Zealand music scene. Set out in Woodhill forest, the electric pioneers Underworld dazzle music-lovers with their Coachella-ready set at this brand-new, boutique music festival amongst the trees. 

Oro Festival 2017

Oro Festival 2017

Want to discover a world of new music? Like our Facebook page

Follow us on Instagram for the best in live music.

DISPOSABLE COFFEE CUPS - SHOULD WE BAN CUPS?

Compostable or Recyclable or Reusable - We have all be tricked by packaging experts.

A lot of kiwis drink their coffee in a compostable cup and think they are doing the right thing. We found out this month, that that was far from the truth. The eco, bio, compostable packaging companies had tricked us. 

So what is the alternative? 

Compostable Cups

What happens when you buy a coffee in a compostable cup? 

If it gets thrown in a recycling or rubbish bin (how many compostable bins have you seen), it goes to landfill, it is now worse for the environment than a recyclable plastic cup.

 

Recyclable Cups

If it gets thrown in a recycling bin dirty (how many people wash their cup before disposing it) or if it goes rubbish bin, it goes to landfill, it is now worse for the environment than a unrecyclable plastic cup.

 

Reusable Cups

How many people remember to bring their reusable cup? How many people forget to wash their reusable cup? If you forget it, or if it is dirty, you will likely end up getting a compostable or disposable cup and adding to the problem. 

The Solution? 

There is a big opportunity. The opportunity is to design a reusable product that becomes part of the system. It becomes a forever cup. It has collection points, it has ease of use, it becomes part of everybody's habits, and it doesn't cost the consumer money, it doesn't trick the coffee companies into compostable, and it saves the world from disposable cups. 

Want to find out more? - email us at info@globelet.com

 

Should we ban plastic plates, cups, and utensils like France?

What plastic has allowed is the ability to make things so cheaply that people feel it’s acceptable to dispose of them after a single use. And, as population grows and commodities become cheaper, waste increases. Plastic is being unfairly blamed for an economic, cultural, and population growth problem.

Let’s look at how long it takes for trash to decompose 

 

Whoa, what a surprise, glass takes the longest to decompose and a plastic bottle takes 0.045% of the time to decompose as a glass bottle. Yes, I know, but glass is “pretty” garbage. We all love to find old glass on the beach. Sea glass is cool! Sea plastic is bad…. Never mind both come from landfills and trash dumps.

Oh, what’s that? A leather bag would take 50 years to decompose, while a plastic bag would only take 10–20 years? How can that be?

The problem isn’t how quickly it decomposes, it’s how many are discarded after a single use.

Should countries mandate that all plates, cups, and utensils marketed as disposable be made reusable?

It is not plastic that is the problem, it is “DISPOSABLE” Plastic.

The plastics economy is worth 120 billion dollars globally. They have big lobby groups.

40–60% of all plastic produced is for packaging. Coffee cups and bags - right the way though to the box that holds your baking soda.

95% of all this packaging is DISPOSABLE - aka a single use item - this all either goes into landfill, into the ocean or is burnt.

 

Plastic transformed the world

Plastic transformed the world completely. Airplanes are now made up of over 80% plastic. We have it in almost all parts of our everyday lives. Most of us think plastic is the problem, but with plastic came increased shelf life, lower food prices and cheaper products.

The result: we have more wealth than the last king of France. Plastic made everything cheap.

DISPOSABLE plastic however only has one single use. It has no collection (40 years ago plastic recycling was created with coding, yet only 14% has ever been collected and recycled). The collection is the issue, and as a result 35% of plastic produced heads to the ocean every year. [1]i That is equivalent to a garbage truck ever minute dropping rubbish into the ocean. The cost is 40 billion dollars. This is more than than pulled profits collectively from the entire plastic packaging industry.

Plastic production is increasing fast. Everyday more plastic enters our lives in unique ways. This has an effects on the ocean, environment and financially it is costing us a lot of money.

Society has been aware of the disposable waste problem for a long time, this has not stopped the production increasing and zero collection systems being designed to scale a solution.

Here is to New Zealand and Australia following France's lead and finally doing something about the massive disposable problem.  

 

THREE WAYS MAJOR EVENTS, VENUES AND SPORTS WASTE MONEY

Events and Venues are always trying to reduce cost and make a marginal profit. The margins are so small that most events struggle to find their way through it, and as a result often end up losing money. 

Below are 3 ways events can save money, improve their event, and improve the overall experience: 

 

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

1 Catering

There is a reason Sydney Showgrounds' catering is kept in-house. It's the same reason Vector Arena recently stopped outsourcing their catering.

Catering companies offer venues large cash incentives and free machinery investment, but more and more venues are now waking up to the fact that nothing is free. 

Why?

Every dollar counts, including money made over the bar from drink and food sales. More importantly fans don’t show up to an event for the music, rugby or event itself - they show up for the experience. 

THE EXPERIENCE IS EVERYTHING. 

Catering companies make most of their money from the backhanded rebates from food companies. The stadiums outsourced catering sell's a Coca Cola for $6, few people buy it due to the high cost, and then the stadium's catering books show “no money”, but back at the catering company's Head Office Coca Cola just paid a nice fat check for the opportunity to sell its sugar water at the venue. The Catering companies HQ makes a lot of money. 

The interest of the catering company is not to make the event experience better, it is to increase margins and make more money. 

It is a conflicting interest with the event organizers and venues.  

So why do venues outsource their bread and butter to catering companies? 

The first reason is the incentives, but beyond money, the main reason is that it removes any risk and blame from the venue organizers. When something goes wrong at the event, (long lines and slow service) the event organizer can blame the catering company. 

So what can event’s do? 

Bring their catering in-house. It is easier said than done. But if you can find the special someone who has the leadership to make this happen, you will never look back.  

Get in contact with someone like, Matthew Lazarus-Hall - Owner of Uncommon cord - he has a wealth of strategic knowledge in the entertainment industry. 

2 Waste Management

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from Sportbuzzbusiness

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from Sportbuzzbusiness

There is a reason almost every Rugby Club in France has a set of reusable cups. 

It is the same reason the Rugby World Cup introduced a reusable cup system at the 2015 events in England. 

And it is the same reason the Rio Olympics had 45 different reusable cup designs that made not just a major impact on waste but increased their beer sales dramatically. 

Waste management cost are increasing year on year. There is no option for events, but to bow down to $40,000 + waste bills. 

What is the main reason for the waste? 

Disposable products. 

Disposable cups. Disposable Tents. Disposable Food Packaging. Disposable everything. 

There is a reason San Fran decided to eliminate disposable bottles from the city and it is the same reason France has banned disposable food packaging from 2020 . 

It is why major sports teams and venues like Twickenham and Stade de France are leading the charge for reusable products in Europe. 

Reusable products not only reduce waste but increase beer sales, create a souvenir and whole new revenue stream for sports teams and venues. 

Lets hope more Sports business in New Zealand and Australia open up to the opportunity. 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

 

 

3 Alcohol Laws

 

Lets face it, we all just want to have a good time. 

How do you increase cost to an event? 

Health and Safety. 

Why? Everybody has to comply with Health and Safety. Nobody refutes it. Society abides by the state law as there is no alternative. 

The result? 

Health and Safety brings increase paperwork, which brings on extra cost. 

It is how the Dairy industry saw Fonterra grow and take out all small milk producer. 

It is how the meat industry created 3 big companies and eliminated the hundreds of small processing plants. 

In the event industry the big push right now is Alcohol Laws. 

It is now seeing many events almost go out of business. This includes racing club's, major venues, festivals, and more. 

The worst part - every region has different restrictions and different ideas about intoxication. 

So what can you do? 

Smart events like Toast Martinborough have hired a new events manager who understood all alcohol compliance in-depth. This means more events need to find managers who have a clear understanding of all the laws and build relationships with the authorities.

Other event organizers are putting $10,000-$20,000 aside for miscellaneous spending towards health and safety type incidents and their lawyers fees. 

The RIO Olympics SECRET to DRIVE UP BEER SALES....MARKETING

RIO OLYMPIC REUSABLEGLOBELETS BY SKOL

Ambev's paid a high price for sponsorship at the Rio Olympics, but it was worth it. 

The Brazilian beer company introduced it's Skol brand to the world of reusable souvenir cups, each one emblazoned with a different Olympic sport.

The strategy led spectators to guzzle hundreds of extra litres of beer in the hope to accquire the whole collection of 42 different cups. 

Not only did Ambev sell vast amounts of beer, it has gotten the Skol name into kitchen cupboards across the world. (Globelet Director, Linda Jenkinson brought back 20) 

The popularity of the Globelet concept makes sense at an event where T-shirts from the Rio 2016 megastore cost 95 reais ($30NZD), making a $13-real beer-and-cup offering a bargain.

The faceoff between Brazilian and Swedish women soccer teams the semi finals - based at the Maracana soccer stadium - demonstrated how much of a hit the cups were. Skol's beer stations were bustling with activity.

"Of course I'm buying more beer because of the cups," said Claudia Maria Dias de Sousa, 58, a physical education teacher from Belem, Brazil. "They're souvenirs for my friends from the Rio Olympics."

The collection of cups from every sport at the games. 

 

Dias de Sousa said she has collected eight of the hard plastic cups so far. She was overheard requesting a basketball cup because soccer had sold out. At a basketball game Saturday night, a spectator tossed one of the yellow and green cups into a trash bin at half time. Within a minute someone had retrieved it, adding it to a stack of more than 10 he was carrying around.

"People will go for the perception of getting something that's special and spend the extra money," said Joe Favorito, a sports marketing expert who teaches at Columbia University in New York. "It's a great branding opportunity for Skol."

Ambev, which is controlled by Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, needed to deliver strong results at this year's Olympics. With Brazil mired in recession, the company sold less beer by volume in the second quarter than it has in the last seven years, while also losing market share to less expensive rivals. Chief Executive Officer Bernardo Pinto Paiva told investors on that 2017 could be better as consumer confidence recovers and inflation slows.

The idea was to pay homage to the different Olympic sports, instead the cups turned into a hot collector's item, Bruna Buas, Ambev's Olympics manager, said through a press officer.

In response to the cup craze and to promote responsible drinking, Ambev said it has set aside space at venues where fans can exchange cups as if they were Pokemon cards.

Skol's strategy isn't totally unique. Budweiser, which Ambev sells as a premium brand in Brazil, had a collectible cup at the FIFA World Cup in Brazil in 2014. Coca-Cola did something similar. But the gimmick of building a collection of Skol cups sets it apart. It also means beer salespeople must often negotiate the details of the cup before serving a beer.

Let's hope the All Blacks, NZ Cricket and stadiums want to get in support of a similar concept in New Zealand and Australia. Globelet is here to make it happen. 

Rio Collectors Cup

The Truth about Compostable Cups

Why festivals stopped using compostable cups?

When Splore festival decided to introduce Globelet, the main cause for change was that they were consuming over 5 compostable cups per person.

With Globelet they only needed 1.5 cups per person. 

That is almost five times less cups consumed per person. 

 

How can a disposable product be ecological?

A biodegradable cup, like any cup, requires the consumption of raw materials for it's manufacture.

Every cup that is made, regardless that it is made of compostable material, requires the same amount of energy as it takes to produce a Globelet. 

What does this mean?

5 times as many cups a produce per person when a compostable cup is used and every cup is produced for single use. 

Biodegradable cups are not eliminated immediately from this earth and take a significant amount of time to degrade.

The worst part: Biodegradable cups need to be sorted perfectly to be used for compost.


 

THE RESULT

A Globelet cup is circular

  • Made in New Zealand

  • Reused (100 times)

  • Reusable locally (wash) at our washing centres

  • Refurbish locally (we can reprint the cup)

  • Recycled locally (we can recycle any of our cups in New Zealand)

A Compostable cup is linear 

  • Made in China

  • Used (1 time)

  • Discarded

  • Composted (if it is lucky to make it to the compost factory)

 

GREAT KIWI BEER FEST - CASE STUDY

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 2013

  • Globelet:  1 years

  • Location: 
    Hagley Park, Christchurch

  • Attendees: 14,000

  • Globelet's used: 14,000

  • Savings: $10,000*

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 50,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold.

Hokitika Wild Foods Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 1990

  • Globelet: 2 year

  • Location: Hokitika

  • Attendees: 8000

  • Event Duration: 1 day

  • Globelet's used: 15,000

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 45,000 /yr
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Womad Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 2004

  • Globelet: 3 year

  • Location: New Plymouth

  • Attendees: 22,000

  • Globelet's used: 25,000

  • Revenue: $50,000*

  • Savings: $10,000*

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 55,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Sydney Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 1976

  • Globelet: 2 year

  • Location: Sydney

  • Attendees: 100,000

  • Globelets used: 15,000

  • Revenue: $150,000*

  • Savings: $30,000

    DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 150,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Auckland City Limits Festival

  • Founded: 2016
  • Globelet: 1 year

  • Location: Auckland

  • Attendees: 20,000

  • Globelet's used: 50,000

  • Revenue: $50,000*

  • Savings: $20,000

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 150,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

The Cost of Disposible Cups

Globelet is not a cup company

Most people believe Globelet is a cup company. We are not a cup company. 

You won't find us at some retail outlet.
You won't find us packaged up in some box to save yet another coffee cup.

We imagine a future without disposable cups. To do that, it is less about cups and more about the systems. 

Yes the cup itself is important. That is why all our Globelet's are locally made, 100% reusable, and 100% recyclable locally. 

But the full designed system from our local production, onsite festival systems, washing and logistics, and end of use storage and recycling. That is the full loop.

At globelet we imagine a reusable society. One with less goods made and more goods reused.

The cost of disposables

The life cycle of a product is the most important product itself. 

When someone looks at Globelet they compare us to disposable cups. 

They think Globelet is expensive. They normally pay 10/20 cents for a disposable cup. 

Here is what the events forget: 

- For every Globelet required an event needs 5 times as many disposable cups. That means 50,000 cups for every 10,000 people. This cost is $10,000.

- Then there is the other cost. Environmental, cleanliness of the event, and the real cost to pick up and dispose of all those cups.  This cost is $10,000.

All up Disposable Cups (whether compostable or recyclable) require a larger spend then Globelet and its system. $20,000.