Washing and Drying Reusable Cups

About Us:

  • Founded in 2012

  • Globelet vision is to end single use plastic in our lifetime, together.

Our Machines:

  • In 2016 we invented dishwashing machines that use less water and energy than traditional dishwashing machines, and can wash over 10,000 cups per hour.

  • We also invented Drying Machines that can dry over 10,000 cups per hour to 100% dryness, ensuring that cups are packed and hygienically packaged. If any water is left on a cup, there is a high chance for mould to grow, which becomes a safety concern.

I NEED A WASHING AND DRYING MACHINE FOR MY BUSINESS?

Please contact us at sales@globelet.com if you would like to purchase any equipment from us.

How To Dry Reusable Plastic Cups

How To Dry Reusable Plastic Cups

Plastic Cups don’t dry like glass.

  • If you stack a plastic cup for more than 24 hours it will start to grow mould.

  • How do you wash and dry more than 10,000 cups per hour?

These are just some of the challenges we faced when we started Globelet in 2012. We went to some of the worlds most advanced dishwashing companies hat supply some of the worlds largest catering companies and even they could not help us.

So what did we do?

How Stone and Wood Brewery is leading the way with reusable cups

Stone and wood.png

Stone & Wood Brewery

#forcupssake

Since partnering with Globelet to launch #forcupssake – Stone & Wood’s cup exchange initiative, the brewery has saved over 20,000 cups from entering landfill or recycling centres in just 6 months!

 

“Introducing #forcupssake at various food and craft beer festivals and at our own Stone & Wood events we have demonstrated that there is a successful solution to eliminating single use packaging at events within our communities. The high return rate on cups at festivals and events means our drinkers are getting it and want to be a part of the solution to a circular economy” says Sarah Blomkamp from Stone & Wood Brewery.

 

In addition to eliminating single use cups at events, the brewery employees’ local not-for-profit Shift Project to wash their cups after each event at their Byron Bay based brewery so they can continue to use the cups at events and encourage a circular economy.

 

“We hope that we can influence more breweries / festivals around Australia to eliminate single use packaging and implement using re-usable cups”, says Sarah.

Sarah Blomkamp - Stone and Wood

 

 

Australian version of the Freiberg Cup

Customers pay $1 for a reusable cup that can be returned to any participating business in the city center.

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How often have you found yourself needing a coffee on the run, yet without a reusable mug? Does it prevent you from ordering that coffee? Unless you're Bea Johnson, the answer is likely "no." You take the coffee to go, and, if you're like me, feel incredibly guilty for the duration of the drink.

But what if you could get a reusable coffee mug on the spot -- an affordable, convenient option that eliminates a good amount of waste? (And I'm not talking about the $25 themed ones that Starbucks hawks aggressively at Christmastime.)

The city of Freiburg, Germany, has come up with an excellent solution to the problem of rampant coffee cup waste and human forgetfulness. In November 2016, it launched the Freiburg Cup, a hard plastic to-go cup with a disposable lid that's provided to businesses by the city. Customers pay a €1 deposit for the cup, which can be returned to any one of 100 stories in the city center. These stores will disinfect and reuse the cups, up to 400 times. Participating stores have an identifying green sticker in the window.

The food- and dishwasher-safe cups are made in southern Germany from polypropylene and do not contain BPA or plasticizers. According to the new Life Without Plastic book (my go-to reference on plastic safety), polypropylene is fairly heat resistant and considered "relatively safe."

The program has been hugely successful in its first year, especially among students on the university campus. Other cities throughout Germany have expressed interest in replicating the program.

From the FAQ section of the Freiburg Cup website, having a reusable cup option is particularly relevant for Germans, who drink an impressive 300,000 cups of coffee per hour. This adds up to 2.8 billion coffee cups a year, all of which are used for an average of 13 minutes before being tossed out.

Disposable coffee cups cannot be recycled easily, as we've explained before on TreeHugger. The paper is lined with polyethylene to keep it waterproof, but this cannot be separated at standard recycling facilities. The resources required to produce such a great number of cups is staggering, as well.

"43,000 trees, 1.5 billion liters of water, 320 million kWh of electricity, 3,000 tons of crude oil. Disposable cups turn into garbage after a short use, and this results in 40,000 tons of residual waste nationwide. The cups are not recycled, in many places, lying around paper cups adversely affect the city cleanliness."

If coffee companies are unwilling to make changes (as Starbucks has shown itself to be), then cities and municipalities need to come up with better solutions -- especially ones that make eco-friendly decision-making as convenient as possible. The Freiburg Cup is proof that creative green alternatives do exist; its model could easily be exported elsewhere around the world.

Indeed, this is what Environment Commissioner Gerda Stuchlik hopes. The Freiburg Cups often disappear into tourists' suitcases as a cheap souvenir, a 15 percent shrinkage rate that is frustrating, but Stucklik sys, "We take comfort in the fact that the idea of educing waste is being exported to the world with every Freiburg Cup."

Reusable Packaging System for Cities

Globelet has released it's reusable packaging service for cities.

By integrating RFID technology we can help retailers reduce single-use plastic packaging through trackable products and an in-built loyalty schemes connected to Globelet.

Launched New Zealand. Globelet is taking reusable cups to a new level in the circular economy. Billions of single use paper cups annually are discarded. Disposable cups are 95% cardboard and 5% polyethylene which requires specialist recycling to separate. Paper cup manufacturing generates around 1.3 million tonnes of Carbon Dioxide emissions annually.

3 GREEN IDEAS THAT SAVE EVENTS MONEY

It is hard to put on a successful event. The weather, staff, and logistics are always against you.

The last thing you want to do is be green.

However, some green ideas can save you a lot of money and time. 

Here are 3 ideas that every festival and event should implement.

Stop Single Use Compostables and Plastic Products

  1. In 40 years only 14% of plastic has been recycled

  2. Compostable Plastic still has to be sorted and composed of like plastic. Unless you are paying for proper systems it will cost you more money and have no real effect apart from green washing.  

  3. It takes almost the same amount of energy to produce a reusable product as a compostable product. 

  4. Whether compostable or plastic. If single-use they will litter the event and make it untidy. 

 

SOLUTION: 
Use a reusable cup system like Globelet. This will save your event a lot of money and create real change.

Tane WIlliams Globelets

 

Deposit Can Systems

  1. Unlike plastic aluminium cans are more readily recyclable.

  2. Festivals like Harbourlife and Grove in the Moo put a $1 deposit on all cans. 

  3. This means that customers do all the sorting and recycling of cans for the customers and saves you a lot of money on cleaning. 

  4. If you must use cans and wet pour is not an option, this is a great green option for events

SOLUTION:
 The Brazilian/Australian team of Motti Smith are leaders in implementing a solution like this. 

Waste Management

  1. Festivals can produce a lot of waste. 

  2. Sometimes it doesn’t matter if you have a can or reusable cup system.

  3. Vendors and Camping create the most waste. 

  4. The best solution is to contract a waste team who understands events and does 100% of sorting of both recycling, rubbish and compostable bins. 

  5. This has the benefit of having a record of where all your waste comes from, what it is and how much it cost so you can strategise to minimise it in future years. 

SOLUTION:

Clean Event is the only waste company that will sort 100% of your waste and recycling so you can have data on your true diversion rate. 

DISPOSABLE COFFEE CUPS - SHOULD WE BAN CUPS?

Compostable or Recyclable or Reusable - We have all be tricked by packaging experts.

A lot of kiwis drink their coffee in a compostable cup and think they are doing the right thing. We found out this month, that that was far from the truth. The eco, bio, compostable packaging companies had tricked us. 

So what is the alternative? 

Compostable Cups

What happens when you buy a coffee in a compostable cup? 

If it gets thrown in a recycling or rubbish bin (how many compostable bins have you seen), it goes to landfill, it is now worse for the environment than a recyclable plastic cup.

 

Recyclable Cups

If it gets thrown in a recycling bin dirty (how many people wash their cup before disposing it) or if it goes rubbish bin, it goes to landfill, it is now worse for the environment than a unrecyclable plastic cup.

 

Reusable Cups

How many people remember to bring their reusable cup? How many people forget to wash their reusable cup? If you forget it, or if it is dirty, you will likely end up getting a compostable or disposable cup and adding to the problem. 

The Solution? 

There is a big opportunity. The opportunity is to design a reusable product that becomes part of the system. It becomes a forever cup. It has collection points, it has ease of use, it becomes part of everybody's habits, and it doesn't cost the consumer money, it doesn't trick the coffee companies into compostable, and it saves the world from disposable cups. 

Want to find out more? - email us at info@globelet.com

 

Should we ban plastic plates, cups, and utensils like France?

What plastic has allowed is the ability to make things so cheaply that people feel it’s acceptable to dispose of them after a single use. And, as population grows and commodities become cheaper, waste increases. Plastic is being unfairly blamed for an economic, cultural, and population growth problem.

Let’s look at how long it takes for trash to decompose 

 

Whoa, what a surprise, glass takes the longest to decompose and a plastic bottle takes 0.045% of the time to decompose as a glass bottle. Yes, I know, but glass is “pretty” garbage. We all love to find old glass on the beach. Sea glass is cool! Sea plastic is bad…. Never mind both come from landfills and trash dumps.

Oh, what’s that? A leather bag would take 50 years to decompose, while a plastic bag would only take 10–20 years? How can that be?

The problem isn’t how quickly it decomposes, it’s how many are discarded after a single use.

Should countries mandate that all plates, cups, and utensils marketed as disposable be made reusable?

It is not plastic that is the problem, it is “DISPOSABLE” Plastic.

The plastics economy is worth 120 billion dollars globally. They have big lobby groups.

40–60% of all plastic produced is for packaging. Coffee cups and bags - right the way though to the box that holds your baking soda.

95% of all this packaging is DISPOSABLE - aka a single use item - this all either goes into landfill, into the ocean or is burnt.

 

Plastic transformed the world

Plastic transformed the world completely. Airplanes are now made up of over 80% plastic. We have it in almost all parts of our everyday lives. Most of us think plastic is the problem, but with plastic came increased shelf life, lower food prices and cheaper products.

The result: we have more wealth than the last king of France. Plastic made everything cheap.

DISPOSABLE plastic however only has one single use. It has no collection (40 years ago plastic recycling was created with coding, yet only 14% has ever been collected and recycled). The collection is the issue, and as a result 35% of plastic produced heads to the ocean every year. [1]i That is equivalent to a garbage truck ever minute dropping rubbish into the ocean. The cost is 40 billion dollars. This is more than than pulled profits collectively from the entire plastic packaging industry.

Plastic production is increasing fast. Everyday more plastic enters our lives in unique ways. This has an effects on the ocean, environment and financially it is costing us a lot of money.

Society has been aware of the disposable waste problem for a long time, this has not stopped the production increasing and zero collection systems being designed to scale a solution.

Here is to New Zealand and Australia following France's lead and finally doing something about the massive disposable problem.  

 

THREE WAYS MAJOR EVENTS, VENUES AND SPORTS WASTE MONEY

Events and Venues are always trying to reduce cost and make a marginal profit. The margins are so small that most events struggle to find their way through it, and as a result often end up losing money. 

Below are 3 ways events can save money, improve their event, and improve the overall experience: 

 

 Catering at Dunedin Stadium

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

1 Catering

There is a reason Sydney Showgrounds' catering is kept in-house. It's the same reason Vector Arena recently stopped outsourcing their catering.

Catering companies offer venues large cash incentives and free machinery investment, but more and more venues are now waking up to the fact that nothing is free. 

Why?

Every dollar counts, including money made over the bar from drink and food sales. More importantly fans don’t show up to an event for the music, rugby or event itself - they show up for the experience. 

THE EXPERIENCE IS EVERYTHING. 

Catering companies make most of their money from the backhanded rebates from food companies. The stadiums outsourced catering sell's a Coca Cola for $6, few people buy it due to the high cost, and then the stadium's catering books show “no money”, but back at the catering company's Head Office Coca Cola just paid a nice fat check for the opportunity to sell its sugar water at the venue. The Catering companies HQ makes a lot of money. 

The interest of the catering company is not to make the event experience better, it is to increase margins and make more money. 

It is a conflicting interest with the event organizers and venues.  

So why do venues outsource their bread and butter to catering companies? 

The first reason is the incentives, but beyond money, the main reason is that it removes any risk and blame from the venue organizers. When something goes wrong at the event, (long lines and slow service) the event organizer can blame the catering company. 

So what can event’s do? 

Bring their catering in-house. It is easier said than done. But if you can find the special someone who has the leadership to make this happen, you will never look back.  

Get in contact with someone like, Matthew Lazarus-Hall - Owner of Uncommon cord - he has a wealth of strategic knowledge in the entertainment industry. 

2 Waste Management

 Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from  Sportbuzzbusiness

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from Sportbuzzbusiness

There is a reason almost every Rugby Club in France has a set of reusable cups. 

It is the same reason the Rugby World Cup introduced a reusable cup system at the 2015 events in England. 

And it is the same reason the Rio Olympics had 45 different reusable cup designs that made not just a major impact on waste but increased their beer sales dramatically. 

Waste management cost are increasing year on year. There is no option for events, but to bow down to $40,000 + waste bills. 

What is the main reason for the waste? 

Disposable products. 

Disposable cups. Disposable Tents. Disposable Food Packaging. Disposable everything. 

There is a reason San Fran decided to eliminate disposable bottles from the city and it is the same reason France has banned disposable food packaging from 2020 . 

It is why major sports teams and venues like Twickenham and Stade de France are leading the charge for reusable products in Europe. 

Reusable products not only reduce waste but increase beer sales, create a souvenir and whole new revenue stream for sports teams and venues. 

Lets hope more Sports business in New Zealand and Australia open up to the opportunity. 

 Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

 

 

3 Alcohol Laws

 

Lets face it, we all just want to have a good time. 

How do you increase cost to an event? 

Health and Safety. 

Why? Everybody has to comply with Health and Safety. Nobody refutes it. Society abides by the state law as there is no alternative. 

The result? 

Health and Safety brings increase paperwork, which brings on extra cost. 

It is how the Dairy industry saw Fonterra grow and take out all small milk producer. 

It is how the meat industry created 3 big companies and eliminated the hundreds of small processing plants. 

In the event industry the big push right now is Alcohol Laws. 

It is now seeing many events almost go out of business. This includes racing club's, major venues, festivals, and more. 

The worst part - every region has different restrictions and different ideas about intoxication. 

So what can you do? 

Smart events like Toast Martinborough have hired a new events manager who understood all alcohol compliance in-depth. This means more events need to find managers who have a clear understanding of all the laws and build relationships with the authorities.

Other event organizers are putting $10,000-$20,000 aside for miscellaneous spending towards health and safety type incidents and their lawyers fees. 

The Truth about Compostable Cups

Why festivals stopped using compostable cups?

When Splore festival decided to introduce Globelet, the main cause for change was that they were consuming over 5 compostable cups per person.

With Globelet they only needed 1.5 cups per person. 

That is almost five times less cups consumed per person. 

 

How can a disposable product be ecological?

A biodegradable cup, like any cup, requires the consumption of raw materials for it's manufacture.

Every cup that is made, regardless that it is made of compostable material, requires the same amount of energy as it takes to produce a Globelet. 

What does this mean?

5 times as many cups a produce per person when a compostable cup is used and every cup is produced for single use. 

Biodegradable cups are not eliminated immediately from this earth and take a significant amount of time to degrade.

The worst part: Biodegradable cups need to be sorted perfectly to be used for compost.


 

THE RESULT

A Globelet cup is circular

  • Made in New Zealand

  • Reused (100 times)

  • Reusable locally (wash) at our washing centres

  • Refurbish locally (we can reprint the cup)

  • Recycled locally (we can recycle any of our cups in New Zealand)

A Compostable cup is linear 

  • Made in China

  • Used (1 time)

  • Discarded

  • Composted (if it is lucky to make it to the compost factory)