Should we ban plastic plates, cups, and utensils like France?

What plastic has allowed is the ability to make things so cheaply that people feel it’s acceptable to dispose of them after a single use. And, as population grows and commodities become cheaper, waste increases. Plastic is being unfairly blamed for an economic, cultural, and population growth problem.

Let’s look at how long it takes for trash to decompose 

 

Whoa, what a surprise, glass takes the longest to decompose and a plastic bottle takes 0.045% of the time to decompose as a glass bottle. Yes, I know, but glass is “pretty” garbage. We all love to find old glass on the beach. Sea glass is cool! Sea plastic is bad…. Never mind both come from landfills and trash dumps.

Oh, what’s that? A leather bag would take 50 years to decompose, while a plastic bag would only take 10–20 years? How can that be?

The problem isn’t how quickly it decomposes, it’s how many are discarded after a single use.

Should countries mandate that all plates, cups, and utensils marketed as disposable be made reusable?

It is not plastic that is the problem, it is “DISPOSABLE” Plastic.

The plastics economy is worth 120 billion dollars globally. They have big lobby groups.

40–60% of all plastic produced is for packaging. Coffee cups and bags - right the way though to the box that holds your baking soda.

95% of all this packaging is DISPOSABLE - aka a single use item - this all either goes into landfill, into the ocean or is burnt.

 

Plastic transformed the world

Plastic transformed the world completely. Airplanes are now made up of over 80% plastic. We have it in almost all parts of our everyday lives. Most of us think plastic is the problem, but with plastic came increased shelf life, lower food prices and cheaper products.

The result: we have more wealth than the last king of France. Plastic made everything cheap.

DISPOSABLE plastic however only has one single use. It has no collection (40 years ago plastic recycling was created with coding, yet only 14% has ever been collected and recycled). The collection is the issue, and as a result 35% of plastic produced heads to the ocean every year. [1]i That is equivalent to a garbage truck ever minute dropping rubbish into the ocean. The cost is 40 billion dollars. This is more than than pulled profits collectively from the entire plastic packaging industry.

Plastic production is increasing fast. Everyday more plastic enters our lives in unique ways. This has an effects on the ocean, environment and financially it is costing us a lot of money.

Society has been aware of the disposable waste problem for a long time, this has not stopped the production increasing and zero collection systems being designed to scale a solution.

Here is to New Zealand and Australia following France's lead and finally doing something about the massive disposable problem.  

 

THREE WAYS MAJOR EVENTS, VENUES AND SPORTS WASTE MONEY

Events and Venues are always trying to reduce cost and make a marginal profit. The margins are so small that most events struggle to find their way through it, and as a result often end up losing money. 

Below are 3 ways events can save money, improve their event, and improve the overall experience: 

 

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

1 Catering

There is a reason Sydney Showgrounds' catering is kept in-house. It's the same reason Vector Arena recently stopped outsourcing their catering.

Catering companies offer venues large cash incentives and free machinery investment, but more and more venues are now waking up to the fact that nothing is free. 

Why?

Every dollar counts, including money made over the bar from drink and food sales. More importantly fans don’t show up to an event for the music, rugby or event itself - they show up for the experience. 

THE EXPERIENCE IS EVERYTHING. 

Catering companies make most of their money from the backhanded rebates from food companies. The stadiums outsourced catering sell's a Coca Cola for $6, few people buy it due to the high cost, and then the stadium's catering books show “no money”, but back at the catering company's Head Office Coca Cola just paid a nice fat check for the opportunity to sell its sugar water at the venue. The Catering companies HQ makes a lot of money. 

The interest of the catering company is not to make the event experience better, it is to increase margins and make more money. 

It is a conflicting interest with the event organizers and venues.  

So why do venues outsource their bread and butter to catering companies? 

The first reason is the incentives, but beyond money, the main reason is that it removes any risk and blame from the venue organizers. When something goes wrong at the event, (long lines and slow service) the event organizer can blame the catering company. 

So what can event’s do? 

Bring their catering in-house. It is easier said than done. But if you can find the special someone who has the leadership to make this happen, you will never look back.  

Get in contact with someone like, Matthew Lazarus-Hall - Owner of Uncommon cord - he has a wealth of strategic knowledge in the entertainment industry. 

2 Waste Management

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from  Sportbuzzbusiness

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from Sportbuzzbusiness

There is a reason almost every Rugby Club in France has a set of reusable cups. 

It is the same reason the Rugby World Cup introduced a reusable cup system at the 2015 events in England. 

And it is the same reason the Rio Olympics had 45 different reusable cup designs that made not just a major impact on waste but increased their beer sales dramatically. 

Waste management cost are increasing year on year. There is no option for events, but to bow down to $40,000 + waste bills. 

What is the main reason for the waste? 

Disposable products. 

Disposable cups. Disposable Tents. Disposable Food Packaging. Disposable everything. 

There is a reason San Fran decided to eliminate disposable bottles from the city and it is the same reason France has banned disposable food packaging from 2020 . 

It is why major sports teams and venues like Twickenham and Stade de France are leading the charge for reusable products in Europe. 

Reusable products not only reduce waste but increase beer sales, create a souvenir and whole new revenue stream for sports teams and venues. 

Lets hope more Sports business in New Zealand and Australia open up to the opportunity. 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

 

 

3 Alcohol Laws

 

Lets face it, we all just want to have a good time. 

How do you increase cost to an event? 

Health and Safety. 

Why? Everybody has to comply with Health and Safety. Nobody refutes it. Society abides by the state law as there is no alternative. 

The result? 

Health and Safety brings increase paperwork, which brings on extra cost. 

It is how the Dairy industry saw Fonterra grow and take out all small milk producer. 

It is how the meat industry created 3 big companies and eliminated the hundreds of small processing plants. 

In the event industry the big push right now is Alcohol Laws. 

It is now seeing many events almost go out of business. This includes racing club's, major venues, festivals, and more. 

The worst part - every region has different restrictions and different ideas about intoxication. 

So what can you do? 

Smart events like Toast Martinborough have hired a new events manager who understood all alcohol compliance in-depth. This means more events need to find managers who have a clear understanding of all the laws and build relationships with the authorities.

Other event organizers are putting $10,000-$20,000 aside for miscellaneous spending towards health and safety type incidents and their lawyers fees. 

The RIO Olympics SECRET to DRIVE UP BEER SALES....MARKETING

RIO OLYMPIC REUSABLEGLOBELETS BY SKOL

Ambev's paid a high price for sponsorship at the Rio Olympics, but it was worth it. 

The Brazilian beer company introduced it's Skol brand to the world of reusable souvenir cups, each one emblazoned with a different Olympic sport.

The strategy led spectators to guzzle hundreds of extra litres of beer in the hope to accquire the whole collection of 42 different cups. 

Not only did Ambev sell vast amounts of beer, it has gotten the Skol name into kitchen cupboards across the world. (Globelet Director, Linda Jenkinson brought back 20) 

The popularity of the Globelet concept makes sense at an event where T-shirts from the Rio 2016 megastore cost 95 reais ($30NZD), making a $13-real beer-and-cup offering a bargain.

The faceoff between Brazilian and Swedish women soccer teams the semi finals - based at the Maracana soccer stadium - demonstrated how much of a hit the cups were. Skol's beer stations were bustling with activity.

"Of course I'm buying more beer because of the cups," said Claudia Maria Dias de Sousa, 58, a physical education teacher from Belem, Brazil. "They're souvenirs for my friends from the Rio Olympics."

The collection of cups from every sport at the games. 

 

Dias de Sousa said she has collected eight of the hard plastic cups so far. She was overheard requesting a basketball cup because soccer had sold out. At a basketball game Saturday night, a spectator tossed one of the yellow and green cups into a trash bin at half time. Within a minute someone had retrieved it, adding it to a stack of more than 10 he was carrying around.

"People will go for the perception of getting something that's special and spend the extra money," said Joe Favorito, a sports marketing expert who teaches at Columbia University in New York. "It's a great branding opportunity for Skol."

Ambev, which is controlled by Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, needed to deliver strong results at this year's Olympics. With Brazil mired in recession, the company sold less beer by volume in the second quarter than it has in the last seven years, while also losing market share to less expensive rivals. Chief Executive Officer Bernardo Pinto Paiva told investors on that 2017 could be better as consumer confidence recovers and inflation slows.

The idea was to pay homage to the different Olympic sports, instead the cups turned into a hot collector's item, Bruna Buas, Ambev's Olympics manager, said through a press officer.

In response to the cup craze and to promote responsible drinking, Ambev said it has set aside space at venues where fans can exchange cups as if they were Pokemon cards.

Skol's strategy isn't totally unique. Budweiser, which Ambev sells as a premium brand in Brazil, had a collectible cup at the FIFA World Cup in Brazil in 2014. Coca-Cola did something similar. But the gimmick of building a collection of Skol cups sets it apart. It also means beer salespeople must often negotiate the details of the cup before serving a beer.

Let's hope the All Blacks, NZ Cricket and stadiums want to get in support of a similar concept in New Zealand and Australia. Globelet is here to make it happen. 

Rio Collectors Cup

The Truth about Compostable Cups

Why festivals stopped using compostable cups?

When Splore festival decided to introduce Globelet, the main cause for change was that they were consuming over 5 compostable cups per person.

With Globelet they only needed 1.5 cups per person. 

That is almost five times less cups consumed per person. 

 

How can a disposable product be ecological?

A biodegradable cup, like any cup, requires the consumption of raw materials for it's manufacture.

Every cup that is made, regardless that it is made of compostable material, requires the same amount of energy as it takes to produce a Globelet. 

What does this mean?

5 times as many cups a produce per person when a compostable cup is used and every cup is produced for single use. 

Biodegradable cups are not eliminated immediately from this earth and take a significant amount of time to degrade.

The worst part: Biodegradable cups need to be sorted perfectly to be used for compost.


 

THE RESULT

A Globelet cup is circular

  • Made in New Zealand

  • Reused (100 times)

  • Reusable locally (wash) at our washing centres

  • Refurbish locally (we can reprint the cup)

  • Recycled locally (we can recycle any of our cups in New Zealand)

A Compostable cup is linear 

  • Made in China

  • Used (1 time)

  • Discarded

  • Composted (if it is lucky to make it to the compost factory)

 

GREAT KIWI BEER FEST - CASE STUDY

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 2013

  • Globelet:  1 years

  • Location: 
    Hagley Park, Christchurch

  • Attendees: 14,000

  • Globelet's used: 14,000

  • Savings: $10,000*

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 50,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold.

Hokitika Wild Foods Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 1990

  • Globelet: 2 year

  • Location: Hokitika

  • Attendees: 8000

  • Event Duration: 1 day

  • Globelet's used: 15,000

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 45,000 /yr
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Womad Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 2004

  • Globelet: 3 year

  • Location: New Plymouth

  • Attendees: 22,000

  • Globelet's used: 25,000

  • Revenue: $50,000*

  • Savings: $10,000*

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 55,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Sydney Festival - Globelet Case Study

EVENT FACTS

  • Founded: 1976

  • Globelet: 2 year

  • Location: Sydney

  • Attendees: 100,000

  • Globelets used: 15,000

  • Revenue: $150,000*

  • Savings: $30,000

    DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 150,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

Auckland City Limits Festival

  • Founded: 2016
  • Globelet: 1 year

  • Location: Auckland

  • Attendees: 20,000

  • Globelet's used: 50,000

  • Revenue: $50,000*

  • Savings: $20,000

DISPLACEMENT

  • Plastic Cups: 150,000 /yr*
    *estimates based on event usage data, and cups sold

The Cost of Disposible Cups

Globelet is not a cup company

Most people believe Globelet is a cup company. We are not a cup company. 

You won't find us at some retail outlet.
You won't find us packaged up in some box to save yet another coffee cup.

We imagine a future without disposable cups. To do that, it is less about cups and more about the systems. 

Yes the cup itself is important. That is why all our Globelet's are locally made, 100% reusable, and 100% recyclable locally. 

But the full designed system from our local production, onsite festival systems, washing and logistics, and end of use storage and recycling. That is the full loop.

At globelet we imagine a reusable society. One with less goods made and more goods reused.

The cost of disposables

The life cycle of a product is the most important product itself. 

When someone looks at Globelet they compare us to disposable cups. 

They think Globelet is expensive. They normally pay 10/20 cents for a disposable cup. 

Here is what the events forget: 

- For every Globelet required an event needs 5 times as many disposable cups. That means 50,000 cups for every 10,000 people. This cost is $10,000.

- Then there is the other cost. Environmental, cleanliness of the event, and the real cost to pick up and dispose of all those cups.  This cost is $10,000.

All up Disposable Cups (whether compostable or recyclable) require a larger spend then Globelet and its system. $20,000.

Humans of Waste - Kombucha

We are a little Kombucha obsessed. 

We drink it everyday and we have created reusable Globelet’s for three of New Zealand’s most iconic Kombucha brands Organic Mechanic , Good Buzz Brewing, and Wabi O.

What is Kombucha? 

Essentially it’s a fermented tea-based beverage that uses a SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast),  as a starter culture to produce a probiotic and gut-healing beverage.

It is good for your gut, which in turn is good for your brain.

A good brain equals a good life. 

We love Kombucha. 

This blog is a dedication to our three favourite Kombucha Brands.

---- 

Organic Mechanic - Auckland

The OM Boys

The OM Boys

Known as the OM boys. 

The Organic Mechanic has exploded on the Auckland scene ever since they set up their famous juice and smoothie stand at the La Cigale French Markets

A year ago they started producing Kombucha. It was the right drink at the right time and the Auckland market exploded. 

As a team of dedicated Eco warriors, they are on a mission as a business to take care of Mother Nature, and do all they can to minimise the carbon footprint they leave behind. 

They are creating a closed loop Zero Waste system with reusable Globelets as their cups and refill keg stations. 

Their next plan is to roll Kombucha Refill Stations (see below) out all over the country, (starting with their OM shack).

 

Wabi O Kombucha - Christchurch

Wabi O Kombucha being bottled 

Wabi O Kombucha being bottled 

Wabi O (‘Wah-Bee-Oh’): Abbreviation for Wabi Originals, a liquid transformation venture. 

Wabi Originals was born out of a chance meeting between a food pioneer and a tea expert in New Zealand.

After the Christchurch earthquakes, Wabi O's founders emerged from the tea room, ready to bring their Kombucha's to the world.

They have an array of different flavours to hit almost anybodies palate, with their product now found in North America and Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Good Buzz Kombucha - Wellington

Good Buzz Family.jpeg

 

We first meet the Good Buzz family at the world famous Wanderlust Festival in Great Lake Taupo

After one year, the family business - run by dad Alex - took off. 

You can now find Good Buzz Kombucha almost anywhere in the country, partenered with various amazing brands, including Globelet.

They are so advanced that they have even brought out a Kombucha that is made with Coffee. 

Reusable vs Disposable (Biodegradable) - What is better?

Globelet began in 2012 as an association between two friends who had no intention of creating a business – we worked voluntarily and with a sole aim of reducing the number of throw away cups being used locally. 

It has now become a full fledging business to try and cope with the issues surrounding disposable cups. 

1) How can a disposable product be ecological?

Even if biodegradable, a cup requires the consumption of raw materials for its manufacture and if this product is only useable once the production volumes increase commensurately in proportion to the volume of cups required.

A container produced for a single use is not environmentally friendly. Biodegradable objects are not eliminated immediately and can take a significant amount of time to degrade furthermore, biodegradable cups need to be sorted perfectly to be used for compost.

2) Globelet cups are made from polypropylene plastic, a derivative of petroleum.

Our cups are washable and (where avoidable) do not end their life in the rubbish after being used, being either kept by the user to be used again domestically or reintegrated into our service and reused, having been washed to Australasian hygiene standards.

It can be used many, many times since we are now looking into how to remove the printed image (only currently available on silkscreen cups) and reprint the cup (exclusive Globelet this year). 

The Globelet cup is plastic, but is not a disposable cup.

The priority is therefore to reduce the use of throw away cups and to reduce the production of biodegradable objects.

The best waste is no waste! To convince you of our commitment and our environmental convictions, I would like to share some of the innovations that we have achieved.

 • The technical characteristics of our cups mean that we can wash them using 6 cl of water.

• Our wash stations are spread over strategic points to be as close as possible to where the cups will be used while ensuring economic sustainability of the concept and of our organisation.

• We are examining creating one of the worlds first reusable cups that is constituted of Algae and there for reusable but can also go back into the Ocean. 

 • Finally, we are examining a project which when proven will permit the reuse of 98% of the washing water while maintaining the current hygiene standards.

I refer you to the study that was made in Germany by an independent consulting firm at the 2006 Football World Cup.

http://www.cupconcept.de/en/news-und-trade-fairs/news/lifecycleassessment.html

The conclusions of this study can therefore be summarised as follows:

• The disposable cup is 25 times more polluting than the reusable cup,
• The biodegradable cup is 20 times more polluting than the reusable cup. In seven games played at Twickenham, it can be estimated that over 1,000,000 disposable pint cups were used, for a total amount of nearly 10 tons of wasted plastic, calculated at 8 grams per disposable cup. This represents a volume of some 70 m3 of plastics in the form of disposable 60-centiliter cups.

The same reasoning can be applied to thousands of events, which would thus generate considerable waste reduction. For our project, the use of plastics is not an issue; in fact, plastic is an interesting material because it is very solid and therefore can be washed and reused!

Moreover, non-reusable cups, such as those which were used during the Rolling Stones and UB40 tour and afterwards recycled, have not proven to be as interesting a solution as that of reusable ones but are nevertheless preferable to the complete wastage of disposable cups!

The idea is therefore to replace the wastage of the disposable, and therefore non-sustainable, product by the use of a cleaning service.

The waste water produced by the Globelet washing procedure is non-polluting as we use a washing solution that is environmentally friendly and created by ECOSTORE.

If all of the Australasia, America, the United Kingdom and Europe were to stop using disposable plastic cups, local cleaning services could be developed. Studies have also shown that with a higher capital investment it would be possible to install cleaning systems that filter and clean the water used in the process so that it can be reused.

This investment has been calculated at €200,000. The use of disposable plastic products will be forbidden in France in 2020 and other countries are considering the same regulations. Washing cups is tedious work. 

At some festivals in Europe cups have been cleaned and reused for 8 years. Some of the cups used at Twickenham have been washed for reuse five times.

Therefore, even better than recycling, our service offers reusability – and the best waste is non existent waste! We hope that the people who decide to keep their cups will reuse them instead of continuing to buy disposable ones. I

In countries like Germany, France, or Spain, where the project is well advanced compared to the United Kingdom, people are often seen using reusable cups at picnics rather than disposable plastic ones.

In 2015 we decided to branch out into Australia to help widen our reach and are in the throes of establishing washing and drying stations here in Australia.

Thank you for helping us to prevent wastage. We are not a large company and it is not our intention to give lessons, but we think that it is no longer possible or logical to continue to use a product once and simply throw it away.

Ryan Everton Director Globelet

HOW TO GROW PLANTS IN A GLOBELET CUP

You can easily plant seeds in a GLOBELET , as opposed to buying traditional starter pots. This can save you some money and is a simple way to recycle old GLOBELETS you may have lying around. Seeds can germinate and grow in just about anything, so long as they get enough nutrients, warmth, light and water. Later, after the plants are growing, you can transplant them into larger containers.

Step 1

Look at the seed packet instructions. Some seeds need to be treated (soaked in water or abraded with a knife, for example) before they are planted, according to The Garden Helper.

Step 2

Fill the Globelet with three-quarters full with potting soil. You can sometimes use soil from your yard, but potting soil is typically better--soil from your yard may contain seeds, insect larva or plant diseases.

Step 3

Wet the soil with water from a watering can (or hold the Globelet beneath a trickling faucet).

Step 4

Poke seeds into the soil. Different plant seeds require different spacing--check the seed packet for recommendations. Typically, you should place seeds 1/8 inch deep and should not crowd them together. You can, however, always thin the plants out when they begin to grow if there are too many.

Step 5

Place the Globelet on a saucer. The saucer will catch water draining from the cup so it doesn't run all over everything. Place the saucer in a warm, sunny area and keep the seeds moist--don't let seeds dry out too much or they may not germinate.

HOW GLOBELETS ARE WASHED AT FESTIVALS

A showcase of our Better Future Factory in Sydney Australia. All washing and drying machines were customs built by Globelet to ensure products are 100% clean, use minimal amounts of water and come out 100% dry.

Washing cups can be difficult. So we made it easy. Here is how we do it. 

Major Events: 

At major events (over 10,000 people) Globelet has 2 options. Onsite washing or offsite post-event washing. 

Onsite Washing:

Our Globelet Washing HQ

How it works: 

All Globelet's are washed onsite. We have a central hub (Globelet HQ) inside here we run our washing machines, logistical equipment, distribution and a front of house.

Globelet supplies: 

  • Staff and Logistics

  • Marquees and Set Up

  • Conveyor cup dishwashers and Conveyor cup dryers

  • A cup return station and support

  • Swimming pool to soak cups

  • Optional wash your own cup bins

Event supplies: 

  • Water access

  • Power Supply

  • Volunteers

We have a happy and helpful team willing to make anything work for an event.

We have a happy and helpful team willing to make anything work for an event.

Offsite Washing:

Our friend Thomas Heaton looking after production washing

Our friend Thomas Heaton looking after production washing

How it works:

Some events prefer to have the majority of the cups washed offsite. This is usually due to the amount of cups they require and access to water is difficult. 

All the cups get shipped dirty from an event and washed and dried at our HQ. 
Two new washing stations being developed in New Zealand and Australia. 

Cups in the pool being washed post festival after ACL.

Cups in the pool being washed post festival after ACL.

The Team Stacking Cups

The Team Stacking Cups

 

Other Events: Globelet Washing

Some tips if you want to wash the cups on the site yourself. 

 

WASHING GLOBELET.jpg

 

  • Have a place from the passage of electrical cables.

  • Have a drinking water point (hot if possible) available.

  • Have a discharge wastewater to reach and out of the passage groups.

  • Provide an electrical point to illuminate the night stand.

  • Install a table, there lay three plastic tubs (we can make available to you on reservation):

The washing set up

Tray 1: wash glasses with a green liquid dish, with a sponge without scraper.

Tray 2: first rinse.

Tray 3: a mandatory second rinse.

The water in the rinsing tank must be renewed regularly. The water in this tank is emptied and refilled. 

Some liquids make the glasses smell and colour (including wine and coffee). If you can not wash the glasses immediately, let them soak. If you wash the cups in hand, please make sure they are washed properly. 

The glasses are machine washable but traditional dishwasher can "throw" the cups because they are lightweight, take a test. We also offer professional glass washers for rent.

The drying space 

our drying rack

our drying rack

Cups should ABSOLUTELY be dry before being stacked and stored. Moist, they become moldy and smelly. We would be obliged to charge you for washing. 

Globelet's are slow to dry. So plan time and space. The method of a pyramid of cups seems to be the best option, but beware of drafts.

Drying is less simple than it seems: polypropylene did very little caloric inertia (compared to glass or metal). So we cannot rely on the heat stored in the dishwasher.

If you have technical constraints to your event, do not hesitate to contact us. We'll help you find a solution.

Once these points considered, you will have a clean site, the public appreciates the approach and you will save hundreds or thousands of plastic cups (which constitute more than half of the waste of the event)..

Wash against Waste

10629401_277260679144942_1682849848529656807_o.jpg

The Wash Against Waste Trailer is an eco-friendly waste reducing system that is available for hire at any event and can be used by anyone.

The Wash Against Waste trailer was built  in November 2013 for the purpose of waste reduction at events. Sarah Jane Murray, our Waste Programme and Development Manager, was an influential force in establishing the trailer.

Working closely with Auckland Council, Ecostore, Kemsol and Smart Environmental, the trailer was launched to become a strong success and a leader in waste-reduction systems for any event. It has since been featured regularly at the New Lynn Night Markets and also attended Splore 2015, and a range of local school fairs.

The Wash Against Waste trailer is the first of its kind in New Zealand. EcoMatters is a NGO and we are aiming to turn Wash Against Wast into a social enterprise for the organisation. We need your help to keep it going and achieve our goals of total waste reduction at events. To support us, you can hire the trailer for any event, with a small hire fee, there are plenty of different options to suit your budget and your event.

Visit the Wash Against Waste website for more details: www.washagainstwaste.co.nz

If you require further information please contact Sarah Jane:

sarah@ecomatters.org.nz

 

HOW TO REDUCE WASTE AT EVENTS…

The waste generated at events has become a major issue. 

Disposable plastic cups litter fields at festivals with smashed cups

 But there are even bigger issues. 

  • Cheap tents get left at the end of events. Smashed. With no option but too go to landfill. 
  • Generators suck litres of diesel just to power the sound systems.
  • Disposable plastic water bottles are consumed just to keep festival goers hydrated. 
  • Thousands of people drive with half empty cars to the same destination with no thought to share the ride. 

The result is tens of thousands of dollars in waste expenses.

It is hard enough for Festival directors to make a profit. The last thing the want to think about is their waste. 

Enter Green Shoot Pacific (GSP).

10007002_813702942005951_7424470462706932302_n.png

GSP are New Zealand's leading event sustainability professionals providing a full suite of sustainability services including waste minimisation strategies.

Founded by one of New Zealand's leading festival directors, Amanda Wright from Splore Festival and New Zealand's leading sustainability consultant, Dave Watson. 

Together they have created remarkable results at numerous festivals in New Zealand including Splore, Rhythm 'n' Alps and Northern Bass

Their main focus includes 

  • The identification of sustainability issues and their impact. 
  • The development of integrated management systems and action plan
  • Team Training

And much more… 

If you are looking at reducing your waste, support the environment and reduce your waste cost. 

Check out GSP here

 

 

 

Dave and Amanda (GSP) with Globelets. 

Dave and Amanda (GSP) with Globelets.