disposible

THREE WAYS MAJOR EVENTS, VENUES AND SPORTS WASTE MONEY

Events and Venues are always trying to reduce cost and make a marginal profit. The margins are so small that most events struggle to find their way through it, and as a result often end up losing money. 

Below are 3 ways events can save money, improve their event, and improve the overall experience: 

 

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

Catering at Dunedin Stadium

1 Catering

There is a reason Sydney Showgrounds' catering is kept in-house. It's the same reason Vector Arena recently stopped outsourcing their catering.

Catering companies offer venues large cash incentives and free machinery investment, but more and more venues are now waking up to the fact that nothing is free. 

Why?

Every dollar counts, including money made over the bar from drink and food sales. More importantly fans don’t show up to an event for the music, rugby or event itself - they show up for the experience. 

THE EXPERIENCE IS EVERYTHING. 

Catering companies make most of their money from the backhanded rebates from food companies. The stadiums outsourced catering sell's a Coca Cola for $6, few people buy it due to the high cost, and then the stadium's catering books show “no money”, but back at the catering company's Head Office Coca Cola just paid a nice fat check for the opportunity to sell its sugar water at the venue. The Catering companies HQ makes a lot of money. 

The interest of the catering company is not to make the event experience better, it is to increase margins and make more money. 

It is a conflicting interest with the event organizers and venues.  

So why do venues outsource their bread and butter to catering companies? 

The first reason is the incentives, but beyond money, the main reason is that it removes any risk and blame from the venue organizers. When something goes wrong at the event, (long lines and slow service) the event organizer can blame the catering company. 

So what can event’s do? 

Bring their catering in-house. It is easier said than done. But if you can find the special someone who has the leadership to make this happen, you will never look back.  

Get in contact with someone like, Matthew Lazarus-Hall - Owner of Uncommon cord - he has a wealth of strategic knowledge in the entertainment industry. 

2 Waste Management

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from  Sportbuzzbusiness

Reusable cups from England Rugby World Cup Image from Sportbuzzbusiness

There is a reason almost every Rugby Club in France has a set of reusable cups. 

It is the same reason the Rugby World Cup introduced a reusable cup system at the 2015 events in England. 

And it is the same reason the Rio Olympics had 45 different reusable cup designs that made not just a major impact on waste but increased their beer sales dramatically. 

Waste management cost are increasing year on year. There is no option for events, but to bow down to $40,000 + waste bills. 

What is the main reason for the waste? 

Disposable products. 

Disposable cups. Disposable Tents. Disposable Food Packaging. Disposable everything. 

There is a reason San Fran decided to eliminate disposable bottles from the city and it is the same reason France has banned disposable food packaging from 2020 . 

It is why major sports teams and venues like Twickenham and Stade de France are leading the charge for reusable products in Europe. 

Reusable products not only reduce waste but increase beer sales, create a souvenir and whole new revenue stream for sports teams and venues. 

Lets hope more Sports business in New Zealand and Australia open up to the opportunity. 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

Reusable cup system that was intergrated in Europe 

 

 

3 Alcohol Laws

 

Lets face it, we all just want to have a good time. 

How do you increase cost to an event? 

Health and Safety. 

Why? Everybody has to comply with Health and Safety. Nobody refutes it. Society abides by the state law as there is no alternative. 

The result? 

Health and Safety brings increase paperwork, which brings on extra cost. 

It is how the Dairy industry saw Fonterra grow and take out all small milk producer. 

It is how the meat industry created 3 big companies and eliminated the hundreds of small processing plants. 

In the event industry the big push right now is Alcohol Laws. 

It is now seeing many events almost go out of business. This includes racing club's, major venues, festivals, and more. 

The worst part - every region has different restrictions and different ideas about intoxication. 

So what can you do? 

Smart events like Toast Martinborough have hired a new events manager who understood all alcohol compliance in-depth. This means more events need to find managers who have a clear understanding of all the laws and build relationships with the authorities.

Other event organizers are putting $10,000-$20,000 aside for miscellaneous spending towards health and safety type incidents and their lawyers fees. 

Reusable vs Disposable (Biodegradable) - What is better?

Globelet began in 2012 as an association between two friends who had no intention of creating a business – we worked voluntarily and with a sole aim of reducing the number of throw away cups being used locally. 

It has now become a full fledging business to try and cope with the issues surrounding disposable cups. 

1) How can a disposable product be ecological?

Even if biodegradable, a cup requires the consumption of raw materials for its manufacture and if this product is only useable once the production volumes increase commensurately in proportion to the volume of cups required.

A container produced for a single use is not environmentally friendly. Biodegradable objects are not eliminated immediately and can take a significant amount of time to degrade furthermore, biodegradable cups need to be sorted perfectly to be used for compost.

2) Globelet cups are made from polypropylene plastic, a derivative of petroleum.

Our cups are washable and (where avoidable) do not end their life in the rubbish after being used, being either kept by the user to be used again domestically or reintegrated into our service and reused, having been washed to Australasian hygiene standards.

It can be used many, many times since we are now looking into how to remove the printed image (only currently available on silkscreen cups) and reprint the cup (exclusive Globelet this year). 

The Globelet cup is plastic, but is not a disposable cup.

The priority is therefore to reduce the use of throw away cups and to reduce the production of biodegradable objects.

The best waste is no waste! To convince you of our commitment and our environmental convictions, I would like to share some of the innovations that we have achieved.

 • The technical characteristics of our cups mean that we can wash them using 6 cl of water.

• Our wash stations are spread over strategic points to be as close as possible to where the cups will be used while ensuring economic sustainability of the concept and of our organisation.

• We are examining creating one of the worlds first reusable cups that is constituted of Algae and there for reusable but can also go back into the Ocean. 

 • Finally, we are examining a project which when proven will permit the reuse of 98% of the washing water while maintaining the current hygiene standards.

I refer you to the study that was made in Germany by an independent consulting firm at the 2006 Football World Cup.

http://www.cupconcept.de/en/news-und-trade-fairs/news/lifecycleassessment.html

The conclusions of this study can therefore be summarised as follows:

• The disposable cup is 25 times more polluting than the reusable cup,
• The biodegradable cup is 20 times more polluting than the reusable cup. In seven games played at Twickenham, it can be estimated that over 1,000,000 disposable pint cups were used, for a total amount of nearly 10 tons of wasted plastic, calculated at 8 grams per disposable cup. This represents a volume of some 70 m3 of plastics in the form of disposable 60-centiliter cups.

The same reasoning can be applied to thousands of events, which would thus generate considerable waste reduction. For our project, the use of plastics is not an issue; in fact, plastic is an interesting material because it is very solid and therefore can be washed and reused!

Moreover, non-reusable cups, such as those which were used during the Rolling Stones and UB40 tour and afterwards recycled, have not proven to be as interesting a solution as that of reusable ones but are nevertheless preferable to the complete wastage of disposable cups!

The idea is therefore to replace the wastage of the disposable, and therefore non-sustainable, product by the use of a cleaning service.

The waste water produced by the Globelet washing procedure is non-polluting as we use a washing solution that is environmentally friendly and created by ECOSTORE.

If all of the Australasia, America, the United Kingdom and Europe were to stop using disposable plastic cups, local cleaning services could be developed. Studies have also shown that with a higher capital investment it would be possible to install cleaning systems that filter and clean the water used in the process so that it can be reused.

This investment has been calculated at €200,000. The use of disposable plastic products will be forbidden in France in 2020 and other countries are considering the same regulations. Washing cups is tedious work. 

At some festivals in Europe cups have been cleaned and reused for 8 years. Some of the cups used at Twickenham have been washed for reuse five times.

Therefore, even better than recycling, our service offers reusability – and the best waste is non existent waste! We hope that the people who decide to keep their cups will reuse them instead of continuing to buy disposable ones. I

In countries like Germany, France, or Spain, where the project is well advanced compared to the United Kingdom, people are often seen using reusable cups at picnics rather than disposable plastic ones.

In 2015 we decided to branch out into Australia to help widen our reach and are in the throes of establishing washing and drying stations here in Australia.

Thank you for helping us to prevent wastage. We are not a large company and it is not our intention to give lessons, but we think that it is no longer possible or logical to continue to use a product once and simply throw it away.

Ryan Everton Director Globelet