reusable cup

FIVE greenest festivals in New Zealand

Check out our list of the greenist events where you can party sustainably.

Splore 2016 - Pink 

Splore 2016 - Pink 

Music festivals around the world are involved in a race to make themselves more sustainable than their rivals. As well as doing the world a solid, a cabinet full of green awards means good press and, hopefully, even better ticket sales. In the world of music festivals, the green initiatives in place are mind-boggling. Splore (pictured above) is the only festival with 'A Greener festival Award' and was the first three day festival to go disposable water bottle free; Womad is arguable the biggest green festival in New Zealand; and the our biggest and most renowned festival - Northern Bass is probably the only Bass Festival that has decided to go single use cup free in the world.

Here are five more sustainable music events in New Zealand. 

SPLORE

This Auckland festival is a giant among men when it comes to sustainability. And it's all because of Splore's founders care so much about doing the right thing. It is the leader in New Zealand for sustainable events. It was the first multi day festival to go single use disposable cups free. It was the first festival to go single use water bottle free. 

Splore Music Festival, 2010 Kawakawa Bay, NZ. photo by Peter Caughey

Splore Music Festival, 2010 Kawakawa Bay, NZ. photo by Peter Caughey

WOMAD

WOMAD is always striving to be the best it can be. It is the pioneering spirit of sustainability for festivals and events in New Zealand. If people think sustainable festival, they think Womad. Just count the reasons how: The festival recycles 70 percent of its waste thanks to Beyond The Bin

Womad Music Festival, photo by Jessica Leong

Womad Music Festival, photo by Jessica Leong

NORTHERN BASS 

NORTHERN BASS is one of the worlds biggest and best Bass Festivals. It is also probably the greenist bass festival in the world. Drink demand is high and sustainability demand is low. However, the owners are pioneers and driving to make the festival as incredible as they can. Its mother company Fuzen Entertainment is owned by some of the most successful event managers in New Zealand. They have seen what waste can do, and went out to make Northern Bass different. 

Northern Bass

SILO PARK  

SIlo Park has transformed the Auckland Food scene. In 2016/2017 they decided to go disposable cup free with huge success. With an event on every week, they were the first successful food market, that consistently eliminated single use disposable cups. 

Silo Park - 2017 

Silo Park - 2017 

ORO FESTIVAL 

ORO FESTIVAL is the newest festival on the New Zealand music scene. Set out in Woodhill forest, the electric pioneers Underworld dazzle music-lovers with their Coachella-ready set at this brand-new, boutique music festival amongst the trees. 

Oro Festival 2017

Oro Festival 2017

Want to discover a world of new music? Like our Facebook page

Follow us on Instagram for the best in live music.

HOW TO GROW PLANTS IN A GLOBELET CUP

You can easily plant seeds in a GLOBELET , as opposed to buying traditional starter pots. This can save you some money and is a simple way to recycle old GLOBELETS you may have lying around. Seeds can germinate and grow in just about anything, so long as they get enough nutrients, warmth, light and water. Later, after the plants are growing, you can transplant them into larger containers.

Step 1

Look at the seed packet instructions. Some seeds need to be treated (soaked in water or abraded with a knife, for example) before they are planted, according to The Garden Helper.

Step 2

Fill the Globelet with three-quarters full with potting soil. You can sometimes use soil from your yard, but potting soil is typically better--soil from your yard may contain seeds, insect larva or plant diseases.

Step 3

Wet the soil with water from a watering can (or hold the Globelet beneath a trickling faucet).

Step 4

Poke seeds into the soil. Different plant seeds require different spacing--check the seed packet for recommendations. Typically, you should place seeds 1/8 inch deep and should not crowd them together. You can, however, always thin the plants out when they begin to grow if there are too many.

Step 5

Place the Globelet on a saucer. The saucer will catch water draining from the cup so it doesn't run all over everything. Place the saucer in a warm, sunny area and keep the seeds moist--don't let seeds dry out too much or they may not germinate.